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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
in contrast to a bill clinton or some of others. but even the president who is come in with very high ratings usually tend to plun nj the second term. twigt eisenhower, one of the most popular presidents ever in american history, by 1957 late and 15958, his ratings were down to about 40%, which was very low in those days. in a way it's an index to the fact the second term president is doing well because you want to see him spending political capital. if he leaves really popular, it may mean he hasn't done enough. >> since world war ii only presidents reagan and clinton went up in popularity? >> indeed. >> a hard act to follow and statistically you're not looking at necessarily more popularity. >> absolutely. >> people come in for a second term and think, okay, now i can relax, i don't have to campaign anymore and i can go do my business. the problem is they are focused on their legacy and things always go wrong in the second term. always, always, always. there's not a president you can mention. they have to sort of stay stay on their toes. they can't relax and just say this is my second term,
to be a situation like when richard nixon was vilified and history judged him fairly over time. similarly with bill clinton. presidents take on big issues that are not popular of the day but history judges them better. i think this will be one of those things that people will say, wow, that was a visionary thing to do. it wasn't popular at the time, but it was a visionary thing to do. i think history will judge him fairly. >> what do you think, though, on jobs that the president could do that would be equal to health care reform? >> i have a big idea. you've heard me talk about obama 2.0. it's all about energy. it's not about drill, baby, drill. it's about natural gas, shale oil -- these are opportunities to transform america. lots of jobs and things we need. we would be less dependent on foreign oil. i think he's going to embrace it. he's already done it, already given the approval that we can export to folks where we have free trade agreements. that's a home run for him. >> rachel, what are you seeing as being a big ticket piece of legislation the president can get passed and have be part of his
accomplishment for him. something that bill and hillary clinton failed to do during their presidency. a democratic priority for decades. he got financial regulation, which is new rules for wall street, which are just in the process now are being impleme implemented, as health care is. neither had a full chance to take effect. he did not get his goals on energy and changing the energy foundations of the american economy. he's going to try to do some of that in his second term with regulatory authority, and he did achieve some measure of economic stability and recovery, but there's a way to go. remember, he took office during a financial crisis, losing 700,000 jobs a month. we're growing, but growing slowly. he's got to try to build on that. >> picking up on that right there, it is a rather mixed bag when you look at the answer to the question, are you better off now than you were four years ago? let's go through some of the accomplishments. median income, federal debt, americans on food stamps, all down. worsened. staying on par, unemployment, same as four years ago. the dow nearly do
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)